Indonesia in deal on water, farming

INDONESIA and Australia last week signed an agreement to begin improving cooperation on water resource management and agricultural planning.
Australian Agriculture Minister Barnaby Joyce and Indonesian National Development Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro said the agreement reflected a growing understanding of the critical role that sound water management would play in the future of both nations.
 
“If Australia and Indonesia are to reach their full potential for productive economic and agricultural growth, it is vital that we work together to ensure regional prosperity," Joyce said.
 
Brodjonegoro said the agreement included shared commitments to information and data exchange; science and technology exchanges; education, training and knowledge sharing activities; and joint studies on policies, programs and regulations.
 
"Through this we will be cooperating to better manage catchment systems, develop efficient agricultural irrigation and assist with the provision of clean, safe and reliable water supplies for communities, industry and the environment," Brodjonegoro said.
 
"It's a key part of the fundamental commitment the Australian and Indonesian governments are making to individual famers, to rural communities and to the security of our nations through better water management."
 
Australia's two-way agricultural trade with Indonesia has grown to around $4 billion a year.
 

Staff Reporter

Australian Agriculture Minister Barnaby Joyce and Indonesian National Development Minister Bambang Brodjonegoro said the agreement reflected a growing understanding of the critical role that sound water management would play in the future of both nations.
 
"If Australia and Indonesia are to reach their full potential for productive economic and agricultural growth, it is vital that we work together to ensure regional prosperity," Joyce said.
 
Brodjonegoro said the agreement included shared commitments to information and data exchange; science and technology exchanges; education, training and knowledge sharing activities; and joint studies on policies, programs and regulations.
 
"Through this we will be cooperating to better manage catchment systems, develop efficient agricultural irrigation and assist with the provision of clean, safe and reliable water supplies for communities, industry and the environment," Brodjonegoro said.
 
"It's a key part of the fundamental commitment the Australian and Indonesian governments are making to individual famers, to rural communities and to the security of our nations through better water management."
 
Australia's two-way agricultural trade with Indonesia has grown to around $4 billion a year.
 

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