Quit the 'China threat' fallacy

BEIJING has criticised Australia and accused it of acting like a condescending master towards Pacific countries, insulting climate-vulnerable nations and "spreading the China threat fallacy".
Quit the 'China threat' fallacy Quit the 'China threat' fallacy Quit the 'China threat' fallacy Quit the 'China threat' fallacy Quit the 'China threat' fallacy

Geng Shuang

Staff Reporter

China Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said Pacific island leaders did not share Australia's fear of Chinese influence in the region.
 
Geng was asked by The Guardian newspaper to comment on an interview by Fijian Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama after the recent Pacific Islands Forum.
 
Bainimarama had said Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison was insulting and condescending.
 
Speaking in Beijing, Geng said Bainimarama's comments were "not the first time that leaders of Pacific island countries resented Australia's behaviour".
 
He said China had been providing assistance to island countries "with no political strings attached" and without insults. Geng also said China was not competing with Australia in the region.
 
"It wasn't the first time that leaders of Pacific island countries resented Australia's behaviour. China has long been providing assistance to island countries with no political strings attached. China doesn't insult island countries and go down and tell the world that we've given this much money to the Pacific islands.
 
"With sincerity, real results, affinity and good faith on one side and a condescending master on the other, it is easy to see the stark contrast," Geng said.
 
The Post Courier reports that while Australia has long been the biggest donor of aid and development funds in the region, China is making inroads through loans to governments and investment in the private sector.
 
Amid China's growing influence in the region, Australia has said it would "step up" in the Pacific and take its engagement to a new level.
 
Geng said Beijing would continue to work with Pacific countries under the framework of South-South Cooperation which, according to the UN, refers to the collaboration between developing countries in sharing knowledge, skills and successful initiatives in specific areas.
 
"We also hope other countries, including Australia, will proceed from the needs of island countries and take more concrete actions to help them grow the economy and improve people's lives with sincerity, instead of the obsolete Cold-War mentality and zero-sum game mindset," he said.

 

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