New environment minister refutes Ramu findings

NEWLY appointed minister for environment and conservation, Wera Mori has rubbished findings by an international team of scientists on the Ramu Nico slurry spill in August.
New environment minister refutes Ramu findings New environment minister refutes Ramu findings New environment minister refutes Ramu findings New environment minister refutes Ramu findings New environment minister refutes Ramu findings

Says report lacks credibility

Mark Tilly

Journalist

 
The team were brought in by the Madang Provincial government and found "alarming" levels of toxic chemicals along the Basamuk Bay and Rai coast area following a Ramu Nico processing facility leaked 200,000 litres of slurry into the sea. 
 
Minister Mori said the findings have not been made available to the Conservation and Environmental Protection Authority, which is conducting its own investigation. 
 
"If they are talking about heavy metals found in the waters and fish, they have to tell us what sort of metals are they talking about, so that we can also tests for those metals," he said.
 
Lead researcher Dr Alex Mojon has told media samples taken from dead washed up marine life have found high concentrations of manganese, nickel, copper and zinc. 
 
The Madang Provincial government has invited CEPA and other government agencies investigating the spill to collaborate at a meeting with group experts, according to Loop PNG. 
 
Mori condemned "misleading" reports on social media which have shown dead fish, dolphins and other marine life washed up on shore in the wake of the spill. 
 
Last week, the international team of scientists were refused entry to the Ramu Nico mine site, to take further samples for their investigation.
 
The mines operator, Metallurgical Corp of China, has condemned the investigation, claiming the team's findings as "defamatory" and "malicious". 
 
A province wide ban from eating and fishing fish is still in place. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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